slightly visual impaired

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slightly visual impaired

C. Brouerius van Nidek
Having growing problems with websites with a bad layout and or
incompatible color combinations I am looking at improving the visibility
of my of the monitor images.

Enlarging text and using bold is one of the solutions but with a bright
whitish page with letters in light yellow or light blue it is me up to
now not  possible to improve the visibility of text and text input
places.

Momentarily I am working with LXQT as I found that it was easier on the
eye than Plasma /KDE

Before I start trying out every possibility to improve readability I
would appreciate some assistance from the experts.



 
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Re: slightly visual impaired

Neil Rickert
On 07/07/2017 11:52 PM, Constant Brouerius van Nidek wrote:
> Having growing problems with websites with a bad layout and or
> incompatible color combinations I am looking at improving the visibility
> of my of the monitor images.

I'm not quite sure what you are looking for.

The first line in my ".bash.expert" is:
unalias -a

That disables all of those annoying aliases that put hard to read colors
into output of some commands.

When updating Tumbleweed, I use:
zypper --terse dup

Here the "--terse" removes the annoying hard to read color, and instead
gives plain black and white
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Re: slightly visual impaired

C. Brouerius van Nidek
On Saturday, July 8, 2017 9:26:04 PM WIB Neil Rickert wrote:

> On 07/07/2017 11:52 PM, Constant Brouerius van Nidek wrote:
> > Having growing problems with websites with a bad layout and or
> > incompatible color combinations I am looking at improving the
> > visibility of my of the monitor images.
>
> I'm not quite sure what you are looking for.
>
> The first line in my ".bash.expert" is:
> unalias -a
>
> That disables all of those annoying aliases that put hard to read
> colors into output of some commands.
>
> When updating Tumbleweed, I use:
> zypper --terse dup
>
> Here the "--terse" removes the annoying hard to read color, and
> instead gives plain black and white

That is what I was looking for. Thanks.

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opensuse:tumbleweed:20170706
Qt: 5.9.0
KDE Frameworks: 5.35.0
kf5-config: 1.0
KDE Plasma: 5.10.3
plasmashell 5.10.3
Kernel: 4.11.8-1-default
Linux User 183145 working on a Pentium IV .

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Re: slightly visual impaired

Felix Miata-3
Constant Brouerius van Nidek composed on 2017-07-09 00:14 (UTC+0700):

> Neil Rickert wrote:
>> The first line in my ".bash.expert" is:
>> unalias -a

>> That disables all of those annoying aliases that put hard to read
>> colors into output of some commands.

:-D

>> When updating Tumbleweed, I use:
>> zypper --terse dup

>> Here the "--terse" removes the annoying hard to read color, and
>> instead gives plain black and white

> That is what I was looking for. Thanks.

All that extra typing each time isn't necessary. Zypper colors can be turned off
via /etc/zypper.conf thus:

         useColors = never

Output of my zypper commands usually remains white on blue, same as login
startup. :-)
--
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words are persuasive." Proverbs 16:21 (New Living Translation)

 Team OS/2 ** Reg. Linux User #211409 ** a11y rocks!

Felix Miata  ***  http://fm.no-ip.com/
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Re: slightly visual impaired

Jan Ritzerfeld-3
In reply to this post by C. Brouerius van Nidek
Am Samstag, 8. Juli 2017, 11:52:09 CEST schrieb Constant Brouerius van Nidek:
> Having growing problems with websites with a bad layout and or
> incompatible color combinations I am looking at improving the visibility
> of my of the monitor images.
> [...]

Regarding web sites, there are many accessibility extensions available:
https://chrome.google.com/webstore/category/ext/22-accessibility
https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/tag/accessibility

Although not being visually impaired, I am using Reader extensions for reading
longer text on web sites with bad layout or horrible color combinations. They
bring the Safari Reader feature (https://support.apple.com/kb/PH21467) to
Chrome and Firefox.

Gruß
 Jan
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Re: slightly visual impaired

Karl Ove Hufthammer
In reply to this post by C. Brouerius van Nidek
Constant Brouerius van Nidek skreiv 08. juli 2017 06:52:
> Momentarily I am working with LXQT as I found that it was easier on the
> eye than Plasma /KDE
>
> Before I start trying out every possibility to improve readability I
> would appreciate some assistance from the experts.

KDE actually has several accessibility features (and accessibility is
one of the main development areas for this year’s Randa meetings,
https://randa-meetings.ch/). If you’re still willing to give KDE a
chance, I would go to the KDE system settings and:

– Enlarge all font sizes. Choose a nice, easy-to-read font.
– Choose a high contrast colour scheme.
– Choose a high contrast icon theme.
– Choose a larger mouse pointer.
– Explore the various ‘zoom’ desktop effects (there are three of them).

In your browser, explore the various accessibility settings. In most
browsers you can override fonts, override font sizes (or set a minimum
font size) and override some or all colors (e.g., you can choose to have
*all* text shown as black on pale yellow with a 20 pixels DejaVu Sans
fonts). Explore the the various accessibility extensions available (see
Jan Ritzerfeld’s post).

If you’re using one of the proprietary graphics card drivers, take a
look at the the available graphics settings available (e.g., for the
NVidia drivers, launch the ‘nvidia-settings’ utility). There you can
change the brightness, contrast, gamma and vibrance used for *all*
applications, and which might make things easier to read. You might also
want to take a look at the available settings for your monitor (i.e., on
your *actual*, physical monitor).

--
Karl Ove Hufthammer

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Re: slightly visual impaired

Karl Ove Hufthammer
In reply to this post by Neil Rickert
Neil Rickert skreiv 08. juli 2017 16:26:
>
> When updating Tumbleweed, I use:
> zypper --terse dup
>
> Here the "--terse" removes the annoying hard to read color, and instead
> gives plain black and white

Several terminal emulators (e.g. Yakuake and Konsole) supports different
colour schemes. If you *want* colours, but find the default colours a
bit difficult to read, it might help choosing a different colour scheme.

(If you, on the other hand, *like* difficult to read text in terminals,
take a look at the unbelievable cool ‘cool-retro-term’ terminal
emulator. :) )

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Karl Ove Hufthammer

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Re: slightly visual impaired

James Knott
On 07/09/2017 08:06 AM, Karl Ove Hufthammer wrote:

> Neil Rickert skreiv 08. juli 2017 16:26:
>>
>> When updating Tumbleweed, I use:
>> zypper --terse dup
>>
>> Here the "--terse" removes the annoying hard to read color, and instead
>> gives plain black and white
>
> Several terminal emulators (e.g. Yakuake and Konsole) supports
> different colour schemes. If you *want* colours, but find the default
> colours a bit difficult to read, it might help choosing a different
> colour scheme.
>
> (If you, on the other hand, *like* difficult to read text in
> terminals, take a look at the unbelievable cool ‘cool-retro-term’
> terminal emulator. :) )
>

Of course, it would *REALLY* help if some web site developers realized
their "creations" look like crap and are extremely difficult to read.

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Re: slightly visual impaired

Carlos E. R.-2
On 2017-07-09 14:55, James Knott wrote:

> On 07/09/2017 08:06 AM, Karl Ove Hufthammer wrote:
>> Neil Rickert skreiv 08. juli 2017 16:26:
>>>
>>> When updating Tumbleweed, I use:
>>> zypper --terse dup
>>>
>>> Here the "--terse" removes the annoying hard to read color, and instead
>>> gives plain black and white
>>
>> Several terminal emulators (e.g. Yakuake and Konsole) supports
>> different colour schemes. If you *want* colours, but find the default
>> colours a bit difficult to read, it might help choosing a different
>> colour scheme.
>>
>> (If you, on the other hand, *like* difficult to read text in
>> terminals, take a look at the unbelievable cool ‘cool-retro-term’
>> terminal emulator. :) )
>>
>
> Of course, it would *REALLY* help if some web site developers realized
> their "creations" look like crap and are extremely difficult to read.
In Spain official sites have to provide another link to their web pages,
with "accessible" versions. Maybe this is some European regulation, dunno.

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Re: slightly visual impaired

Jan Engelhardt-4
In reply to this post by Karl Ove Hufthammer

On Sunday 2017-07-09 14:06, Karl Ove Hufthammer wrote:
>
> (If you, on the other hand, *like* difficult to read text in terminals, take a
> look at the unbelievable cool ‘cool-retro-term’ terminal emulator. :) )

c-r-t by default is monochromatic and therefore has rather legible text.

The real difficulty lies in small glyphs, on high-resolution displays
(xterm 6x12 default bitmap font!)
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Re: slightly visual impaired

Simon Lees-3
In reply to this post by Jan Ritzerfeld-3


On 09/07/17 19:02, Jan Ritzerfeld wrote:

> Am Samstag, 8. Juli 2017, 11:52:09 CEST schrieb Constant Brouerius van Nidek:
>> Having growing problems with websites with a bad layout and or
>> incompatible color combinations I am looking at improving the visibility
>> of my of the monitor images.
>> [...]
>
> Regarding web sites, there are many accessibility extensions available:
> https://chrome.google.com/webstore/category/ext/22-accessibility
> https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/tag/accessibility
>
> Although not being visually impaired, I am using Reader extensions for reading
> longer text on web sites with bad layout or horrible color combinations. They
> bring the Safari Reader feature (https://support.apple.com/kb/PH21467) to
> Chrome and Firefox.
>
> Gruß
>  Jan
>
Stylish is also another plugin to consider https://userstyles.org/ you
can set a "global" style so all sites will look the same (this obviously
works better in some places then others) but there are many styles that
atleast make every website readable (but not pretty)

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